Category: Illegal Drug Searches

Sniffer Dogs, Searches and Your Rights at Mardi Gras


With the Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade rocking Sydney today, we’ve compiled some basic information about police searches to help you have a blast without your rights being violated: When can police search me? It’s a sure bet that police will have sniffer dogs patrolling in and around the Mardi Gras parade today, and ...

10 Tips For Staying Safe Over New Year’s


With New Year’s Eve just around the corner, it’s no doubt that police will once again be out in force patrolling the streets. Every year, police arrest a large number of people – many for alcohol-related offences. However, there are things you can do to avoid trouble whilst celebrating the new year. We’ve compiled our ...

What are the Rules for Strip Searching?


“I removed my clothes one piece at a time as requested. When we had stripped down to our underwear in the street, we were searched. I honestly felt the only way to prevent the search becoming more intrusive or sexual was to remain as quiet and docile as possible. I later wondered why I was ...

Is a Positive Indication by a Sniffer Dog enough for Police to search you? Part 2: Applying Empirical Data


In Part 1 of this series, we outlined the law relating to ‘reasonable suspicion’. To re-cap, the law says that police can only search you for drugs if they have a ‘suspicion on reasonable grounds’ that you have drugs on you at that particular time. In the leading case of R v Rondo, Justice Smart ...

Is a positive indication by a sniffer dog enough for police to search you? Part 1: “reasonable suspicion”


We have posted numerous articles and videos about the fact that police cannot undertake random or arbitrary searches upon people – they must have a ‘suspicion on reasonable grounds’ before performing a search. This two-part blog aims to answer the question – is the fact that a sniffer dog sat next to me enough by ...

Drug Detection Dogs Reportedly Providing False Leads


It has been revealed that the majority of strip searches by police based on indications from drug detection dogs do not result in any drugs being found. Government data obtained by the NSW Greens and reported in the media reveals that in more than 60% of the searches carried out in 2013, no drugs were ...

Drugs and the white collar sector


A record number of 86,918 drug seizures were made in Australia according to the latest Illicit Drug Data Report by the Australian Crime Commission. But not all of these will make front page headlines or prime time news. The population of drug suppliers within Australia is a mixed bunch and crosses all echelons of society. ...

Police Drug Dogs and Your Rights if They Touch You


Police drug dogs are a common sight at airports, music festivals and at any number of other places or events where police believe that there is a chance people may be carrying illegal drugs. The law states that police aren’t allowed to search you for drugs unless they have a good reason. If a drug ...

Sniffer Dogs: Providing a Factual Basis for Suspicion


In order for police to legally search a person, premises or vehicle for drugs, they need to have a ‘reasonable suspicion’ that an illegal substance has been concealed. If police don’t have a factual basis for suspicion and they search a person, they will have acted illegally, and that person may be able to have ...

R v Rondo – Reasonable Suspicion Explained


Contrary to popular belief, police officers are not allowed to just randomly search people, vehicles and premises for drugs, unless they have a good reason to believe that someone is in possession of an illegal substance. If you have been charged with a drug offence, and you believe that police may have obtained their evidence ...