Section 4 Inclosed Lands Protection Act | Unlawful Entry on Inclosed Lands


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The Legislation

Section 4 of the Inclosed Lands Protection Act 1901 (NSW) is Unlawful Entry on Inclosed Lands and is extracted below.

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4 Unlawful entry on inclosed lands

(1) Any person who, without lawful excuse (proof of which lies on the person), enters into inclosed lands without the consent of the owner, occupier or person apparently in charge of those lands, or who remains on those lands after being requested by the owner, occupier or person apparently in charge of those lands to leave those lands, is liable to a penalty not exceeding:
(a) 10 penalty units in the case of prescribed premises, or
(b) 5 penalty units in any other case.

(1A) A drover or person in charge of stock being driven on a road lawfully inclosed within the lands of any person has a lawful excuse for entering those lands for the purpose of preventing the stock from straying, or regaining control of stock that have strayed, from that road.

(2) Where a road is lawfully inclosed with the lands of any person, and such road is not clearly defined but there is a reasonably defined track commonly used by persons passing through such lands, the centre of such track shall, for the purposes of this Act, be deemed to be the centre of the road.

(3) Where a road is lawfully inclosed with the lands of any person and such road is not clearly defined and there is no reasonably defined track through such lands a person passing through such inclosed lands shall not be guilty of an offence unless it is shown that the route taken by such person in so passing was, having regard to the circumstances, unreasonable.

(4) In this section, “stock” includes horses, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and camels.

“Inclosed lands” is defined as:

(a) prescribed premises, or
(b) any land, either public or private, inclosed or surrounded by any fence, wall or other erection, or partly by a fence, wall or other erection and partly by a canal or by some natural feature such as a river or cliff by which its boundaries may be known or recognised, including the whole or part of any building or structure and any land occupied or used in connection with the whole or part of any building or structure.

“prescribed premises” means land occupied or used in connection with any of the following:

(a) a government school or a registered non-government school within the meaning of the Education Reform Act 1990,
(b) a child care service,
(c) a hospital,
(d) a nursing home within the meaning of the Public Health Act 2010,

and any building or structure erected on that land, but does not include all or part of any building or structure that is for the time being occupied or used for a purpose unconnected with the conduct of such a school, child care service, hospital or nursing home.“Road” means any land proclaimed, dedicated, resumed or otherwise provided as a public thoroughfare or way or any land defined, reserved or left as a road in any subdivision of lands.

(2) Where a road is lawfully inclosed with the lands of any person, those lands, but not the road, shall be deemed for the purposes of this Act to be the inclosed lands of the person.

Section 6 of the Act allows an owner or occupier to perform a ‘citizen’s arrest’ on any person committing an offence under the section who refuses to give his or her name and address.

Section 10 of the Act allows a police officer to issue a penalty notice (fine) rather than a court attendance notice requiring the person to attend court.