Section 93Q Crimes Act | False Information that Person in Danger


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Did you know that making false statements that a person or property is in danger can land you in trouble with the law?

Section 93Q of the Crimes Act 1900 states that it is against the law to convey information that is false or misleading which is likely to make the person to whom the information is conveyed fear for the safety of a person or property.

The information may be conveyed through any means, including an oral statement, a document or electronic communications.

If found guilty of this offence, the maximum penalty is 5 years imprisonment.

However, this is the absolute maximum penalty which will only apply in the most serious cases.

Our lawyers will endeavour to secure the best possible result in your manner by putting forth all evidence in the most persuasive manner.

The Legislation
93Q Conveying false information that a person or property is in danger

(1) A person who conveys information:

(a) that the person knows to be false or misleading, and

(b) that is likely to make the person to whom the information is conveyed fear for the safety of a person or of property, or both, is guilty of an offence.

Maximum penalty: Imprisonment for 5 years.

(2) This section extends to conveying information by any means including making a statement, sending a document, or transmitting an electronic or other message.

(3) In this section, a reference to the safety of a person includes the safety of the person who conveys the information and the person to whom it is conveyed.

Why Sydney Criminal Lawyers?

If you’ve been accused of conveying false information that a person or property is in danger, our lawyers can advise you of the steps you can take to secure the best possible outcome in your case.

Our team consists of criminal law specialists who are dedicated to securing the best possible outcome in each case.

Our lawyers will take the time to listen to your side of the story and examine all the evidence in order to identify any weaknesses in the prosecution case.

If problems are identified, we can write to the prosecution requesting that they drop the charges.

In many cases, this spares our clients the time and expense of fighting the charges in court.

However, if the prosecution refuses to drop the charges against you, rest assured that our fearless advocates will fight hard to protect your reputation in court.

We will present all evidence in the most compelling manner, along with any possible defences to the charges – for example, where the information conveyed was based on an honest and reasonable mistake.

Alternatively, if you wish to plead guilty, our lawyers will present compelling sentencing submissions to persuade the magistrate to impose the most lenient penalty possible.

We have a proven track record of achieving outstanding results in even the most serious criminal cases.

Call us today on (02) 9261 8881 and book your FREE first conference with our criminal law experts to discuss your options.