Criminal Lawyers for Affray and Public Order Offences


Print

‘Affray’, ‘violent disorder’ and ‘riot’ are the most common ‘public order’ offences in NSW.

These charges are normally brought where there has been some kind of a public disturbance.

However, affray and violent disorder can also occur within a private setting such as a person’s home eg during a domestic dispute.

Public Order Offences Generally

Public order charges can be treated seriously by the courts.

It is therefore vital to get advice and representation from specialist criminal defence lawyers who are experienced in dealing with in ‘public order’ cases.

Sydney Criminal Lawyers has successfully represented clients charged with ‘public order offences’ for many years.

We frequently succeed in having ‘affray’, ‘violent disorder’, ‘unlawful assembly’ and ‘riot’ charges withdrawn at a very early stage.

We do this by carefully examining the evidence and writing to police (or DPP) outlining the problems in their case, including any possible defences such as self-defence, duress and necessity.

We jealously protects our clients’ rights, especially when the evidence does not support the charges.

If the matter proceeds to a hearing, we will fight for the dismissal of the charges so that you can get on with your life.

We have been able to secure acquittals in many extremely difficult cases; including charges arising from the ‘Cronulla Riots’ and, more recently, the altercation between members of Biker Associations at Sydney Airport.

Call us anytime for a free first conference on (02) 9261 8881.

Affray – Section 93C of the Crimes Act 1900

Violent Disorder – Section 11A of the Summary Offences Act 1988

Riot – Section 93B of the Crimes Act 1900

Consorting – s 93X Crimes Act 1900

Related Cases

Not Guilty of Affray and Common Assault All Four Defendants Not Guilty of Assaulting Police at The Rocks Finding of 'Self Defence' for Night Club Patron District Court Appeals Successful

Related Articles

Violence in Sport: What Does the Law Say? Brexit Vote Leads to Surge in Hate Crimes Sydney Nightlife is Dead, and Queensland is Set to Follow Anti-Consorting Laws Coming to Canberra Friends with Someone who has a Record? There’s a Law Against That!