Category: Apprehended Violence Orders (AVOs)

Betrayed Domestic Violence Victim Sues Police


By Sonia Hickey and Ugur Nedim The woman whose address was disclosed by a Queensland police officer to her abusive former partner is fighting the state government in court. Domestic violence victim ‘Julie’ commenced legal proceedings after a policeman accessed her personal details on the police database and provided it to his mate, her former ...

Defendants in Domestic Violence Cases Prohibited from Questioning Complainants


By Paul Gregoire and Ugur Nedim Currently, self-represented litigants in the Family Court are permitted to cross-examine opponents, even in circumstances where there has been an allegation of domestic violence. However, the Turnbull government has drafted laws aimed at stopping this. Australian attorney general Christian Porter introduced the Family Law Amendment (Family Violence and Cross-examination of ...

Thirty Six Women Have Been Violently Killed in Australia This Year


Last Sunday, two women were killed in acts of violence perpetrated on opposite sides of the country. At around 4 am that morning, NSW police attended a Griffith residence to find 27-year-old Nicole Wetzler dead in a rear shed on the property. A few hours later 35-year-old Ashley Alchin was arrested and taken to Griffith police station, ...

The Startling Truth about AVOs and Family Law


Statistics reveal that 1 in 3 Australian women experience physical violence over their lifetime. Family violence is being increasingly recognised as a widespread and serious issue in Australia with significant negative social, individual and community impacts. A powerful weapon against family violence is the use of Apprehended Violence Orders (AVOs) to protect victims of family ...

12 Reasons to Choose Sydney Criminal Lawyers


Being prosecuted for a criminal or traffic offence can be a nerve-wracking experience. You may be unfamiliar with the process, unsure of the best way forward and concerned about the outcome. But whether you are charged with a less-serious matter such as drug possession, drink driving or common assault, or accused of something as serious as ...

Victims of Crime May Be Given Access to Perpetrators’ Super Funds


By Zeb Holmes and Ugur Nedim Federal Minister for Revenue and Financial Services, Kelly O’Dwyer, has announced a review of the laws governing superannuation with a view to allowing victims of crime to access the funds of perpetrators. Ms O’Dwyer noted that the rules regarding the early release of superannuation have changed very little since 1977, ...

Apprehended Domestic Violence Orders (ADVOs) Are Now Enforceable Nationwide


By Paul Gregoire and Ugur Nedim As of 25 November 2017, ‘Persons in Need of Protection’ (PINOPs) – or complainants – who are the subject of domestic violence orders (DVOs) in any Australian state or territory are automatically protected nationwide. The National Domestic Violence Order Scheme is designed to reduce barriers that can leave complainants ...

Domestic Violence Video Statements Aren’t Increasing Convictions


By Paul Gregoire and Ugur Nedim On June 1 2015, NSW became the first Australian jurisdiction to allow pre-recorded videos to be used as evidence in domestic violence cases. The Domestic Violence Evidence-in-Chief (DVEC) reforms allow the evidence in proceedings to be presented in either a video or audio format. A 2013 NSW Bureau of Crime ...

Should Complainants Have Access to Paid Domestic Violence Leave?


An average of one woman per week is killed at the hands of their present or former partner in Australia. With reports of domestic violence at an all-time high, there are calls for paid domestic violence leave to become standard in all Australian employment contracts. Victims groups and health workers believe such an entitlement would ...

Surveillance Cameras in the Neighbourhood


Ben moved into a rental property in July this year. He didn’t realise until a few weeks later that his neighbours had installed security cameras which capture not only their own property, but also Ben’s backyard. The cameras are small and hard to see in the daylight, but Ben can see the red lights at ...